Gastronomixs

Peking duck

Pekin ducks are especially bred for this traditional dish. This preparation method results in a beautiful crispy skin that makes this dish especially popular.

Peking duck

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Ingredients

1

whole

Pekin duck (2.5kg)

2

l

water

50

g

honey

50

g

water

Preparation method

  • Pluck the duck and remove the innards. Use the edible organs such as the heart, kidneys, and liver for other preparations. Prepare the duck by removing the wings and upper parts of the thighs, but the head can be left on.
  • Rinse the cavity under running water.
  • Bring the water to the boil.
  • The duck can be blanched in two different ways: the duck can either be submerged in boiling water for two to three minutes after which it is taken out of the pot and set aside to dry on a towel. Alternatively, the duck can be suspended over the pot with boiling water, using a ladle to spoon the boiling water over the duck. Continue pouring the boiling water over the duck for four minutes and then place the duck on a towel to dry
  • Bring the water and honey to the boil. Ladle this mixture over the still-warm duck. Repeat this process for four minutes.
  • Store the duck in a cool and airy space for at least six hours.
  • Preheat the oven to 250°C.
  • Roast the duck for 75 to 90 minutes until done. If the skin of the duck darkens too quickly, cover the duck with aluminium foil and reduce the temperature of the oven to 180-200°C.

Serving suggestions

  • Serve with hoisin sauce, black bean paste, and wheat pancakes.
  • As a main course with the traditional garnishes and sauces.
  • As part of a starter or further preparation, such as a garnish in a warm duck salad.
  • As part of a starter or further preparation, such as a filling for spring rolls.

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