Gastronomixs

Pork ribs cooked sous vide

A gastronomic approach to making spare ribs. This preparation consists of quite a few steps, but don't be alarmed: the preparation does not contain any complicated techniques while time does most of the work. The end result is a magnificent piece of meat that, with the cooking down to the bone, the brining, smoking, and grilling, makes it a perfect addition to a top-class dish. But with the cost price, it can also be served as a snack or as an amuse-bouche.

Pork ribs cooked sous vide

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Ingredients

1

kg

flat pork ribs

100

g

curing salt

1

litre

water

100

ml

veal stock

100

ml

cooking liquid from the spare ribs

50

g

apple treacle

Preparation method

  • Preheat the sous vide bath to exactly 74°C.
  • Make a brine bath by dissolving the salt in the water. You can also warm up the water a little to speed up the dissolving process.
  • Brine the ribs for three hours.
  • Place in a big enough vacuum sealer bag and pull vacuum.
  • Cook in a sous vide bath for ten hours at exactly 74°C.
  • Take the cooked meat out of the vacuum sealer bag and leave to cool a little.
  • You can remove the meat from the ribs if you wish.
  • Grill the meat over a charcoal barbecue.
  • Glaze just before serving with a sauce made from veal stock, cooking liquid, and apple treacle.

Serving suggestions

  • Serve as a classic main dish with baked potatoes or thick-cut chips, chilli sauce, fresh mayonnaise, and a green salad.
  • You could also remove the bones and serve the meat as part of a main dish with a black rice and shaved fennel biscuit.
  • Goes well with a traditional Dutch 'stamppot' dish (a hotchpotch based on mashed potatoes) with Brussels sprouts or sauerkraut.
  • Serve with thick fries and a red cabbage salad.

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