Gastronomixs

Sea buckthorn, brown butter, Douglas fir

Douglas McMaster, born in 1987, is chef and owner of Silo in Brighton, England – the first zero-waste restaurant in this country. He was awarded the title of Yorkshire young chef of the year in 2008 and Britain’s most irreverent chef in 2012. After dropping out of school, Douglas began his kitchen career in the pot wash. Since then he has worked with famous chefs like Fergus Henderson at St John and with Colin McGurran at Winteringham Fields.

In 2011 he travelled through Australia where he met Dutch artist Joost Bakker. Douglas quickly became executive partner and chef at Silo by Joost, the world’s first waste-free café. In his first six months he won several awards including the ‘Restaurant of the year’ award. But, due to family-related reasons, Douglas returned to England where he opened Silo in Brighton in 2014.

Douglas’ cooking style sticks to fundamental basics with inherent respect for nature and its ingredients. Silo is committed to conscious cooking and making nutritious, creative, and delicious food at true cost. At the heart of the restaurant is a composting machine which can produce more than 60 kilogrammes of nutrient-intense compost overnight, which is then used to grow more food. 

This is THE Silo classic… Celebrating ‘off grid ingredients’ or the untapped abundance of nature. The dish needs precise execution to create the ‘F*** me moment’ of which this dish has that rare potential.

Serves 4-6.

Creation by Douglas McMaster, Silo, Brighton.
Photo credit: Xavier D. Buendia

Sea buckthorn, brown butter, Douglas fir

Would you like to view this page?

To see this recipe or part of the website, you need an account. Click on the button below to get a free two-week Gastronomixs trial account. This page and a whole lot of extra features will be accessible immediately!

After the free trial period, you can choose to upgrade to a paid account to retain full access. For just €7 per month or €70 per year, you’ll have access to more than 4,300 components and hundreds of compositions!

Free two-week trial Do you already have an account? Log in now!

Ingredients

250

g

sea buckthorn juice

250

g

filtered/mineral water

3

 

bronze gelatin leaves

175

g

sugar

25

g

Douglas fir needles

25

g

parsley

100

g

rapeseed oil (not cold pressed)

100

g

rye flour

90

g

strong white flour

80

g

sugar

4

g

salt

100

g

brown butter

250

g

water

250

g

sea buckthorn juice

50

g

sugar

500

g

double cream (for caramelising)

250

g

butter

1

tbsp

milk powder

200

g

yolk

125

g

sugar

50

g

honey

10

g

gelatin

450

g

double cream (for whipping)

Preparation method: sea buckthorn jelly
  • Obtain the sea buckthorn juice well in advance. It has a very long shelf life and is difficult to pick and press.
  • Soften the gelatin in water for 5 minutes, squeeze out the excess water, and then dissolve the gelatin in a small pan with a little of the sea buckthorn juice.
  • Once the gelatin has fully dissolved, add to the remaining sea buckthorn juice, sugar, and water.
  • Transfer the mixture to the fridge until the mixture begins to thicken.
  • Whisk the mixture and then pour into Dariole moulds. Note - thickening the mixture before setting will prevent the final jelly from splitting.
Preparation method: Douglas fir oil
  • Blanch the parsley in boiling water, refresh, and squeeze out the excess moisture.
  • Put the parsley, Douglas fir needles, and oil in a blender and blend until it reaches 64°C.
  • Then pass the mixture through muslin.
Preparation method: rye crumb
  • Mix all the ingredients by hand or with a mixer.
  • Transfer the crumble mixture onto silpat mats then bake at 160°C until it turns a light golden brown and will solidify (if cooled down). 
Preparation method: sea buckthorn granite
  • Mix the sea buckthorn juice with the water and sugar and then simply put in the freezer.
  • Regularly stir the mixture with a fork as it starts to freeze so that it becomes light and manageable. 
Preparation method: brown butter mousse
  • The brown butter mousse can be tricky to get right if using natural (non-industrial) cream. As the cow's diet changes, the fat content also changes, which has a significant effect on the ‘whipability’ of the cream. We have learned the hard way that there is little or no consistency in the fat content of our cream.
  • Start making your brown butter mixture by putting 500g of double cream and the butter in a heavy based pan together with the milk powder on a low heat. Caramelise slowly, whisking regularly until the mixture totally separates and the proteins solidify and turn a golden brown.
  • Pass through a muslin cloth and squeeze out any excess butter.
  • Put the sugar in a small saucepan with a tablespoon of water and heat to 120°C on a medium heat.
  • Meanwhile, beat the egg yolks in the kitchen aid until fluffy. When the sugar is at the correct temperature, pour slowly over the yolks whilst whisking them at medium speed. Once all the sugar is incorporated, leave the kitchen aid on a slow speed until the metal mixing bowl cools down to room temperature.
  • Soften the gelatin in water for 5 minutes.
  • Squeeze water from the gelatin and dissolve the gelatin in a little of the whipping cream in a pan over a low heat. Cool to room temperature. 
  • Gently whisk the remaining whipping cream and the gelatin cream mixture in a large bowl until it forms very soft peaks.
  • When all the components are ready (egg yolk mixture, whipped cream mixture, and brown butter solids), fold it all together. Use a rubber spatula as if it were a soufflé. You may need to crumble the brown butter solids by hand. Please note - this doesn’t include the brown butter itself, just the collected solids. The brown butter solids will stay visible, depending on how fine you crumble it into the mixture.
  • Transfer into plastic containers and leave to set in the fridge.

Previous page